Getting to Strasbourg

 

By road

 
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To the west and to the north, the A4, A34, A31 and A32 freeways allow easy access to Strasbourg from Paris, Amsterdam, Brussels, Luxembourg and Bonn via Metz and Sarrebruck. To the south, the Strasbourg-Mulhouse axis, and the A36 intersection of the A6 freeway of Beaune open up routes in the direction of Italy and Spain.
 
 

By train

 
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Strasbourg, one of the most important railway stations in France, is connected by direct links to numerous French cities. Strasbourg is also situated at the intersection of several international axes and benefits from connections with numerous European cities.
 
 

By airplane

 
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The International Strasbourg-Entzheim airport is situated 10 km from Strasbourg's city center by freeway. The German cities of Offenburg, Lahr, Baden-Baden and Karlsruhe are also within easy reach, taking between 45 minutes and 1.5 hours to get to by freeway.
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European diary


    • 1 december 2017

      Romania National Day

    • Greater Romania emerged on December 1st, 1918 with the union of various regions.
      Because of the decline of Russia and Turkey due to the effects of the World War I and because of the dissension in the Austria-Hungarian Empire, the combining regions of Transylvania, Bessarabie and Bucovine created Greater Romania.

      And since the realization of Greater Romania, the 1st December is a day of commemoration and the romanian National Day.
    • 2 december 2017

      International Day for the Abolition of Slavery

    • The International Day for the Abolition of Slavery, 2 December, marks the date of the adoption, by the General Assembly, of the United Nations Convention for the Suppression of the Traffic in Persons and of the Exploitation of the Prostitution of Others of 2 December 1949).
    • 5 december 2017

      International Volunteer Day

    • The International Volunteer Day was adopted by the General Assembly of the UN in 1985. Since then, it has had a strategic value: most of the countries have orientated the volunteering actions towards the achievement of the Millenium Development Goals, a set of objectives and headlines to defeat hunger, illness, illiteracy, the deterioration of the environment and violence against women.