History

 

European Construction

 
paris
 

In 1945, at the end of World War II, Europe was destroyed and many were dead. The nations of Europe had to rebuild the entire continent and find a way to prevent history from repeating itself. The question facing the European countries was this: how do we create conditions for lasting peace between former enemies, how do we get back onto solid ground?

The biggest problem lay in the relationship between France and Germany, who had been arch enemies for decades.....

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European diary


    • 26 june 2017

      International Day in Support of Victims of Torture

    • Torture seeks to annihilate the victim’s personality and denies the inherent dignity of the human being. The United Nations has condemned torture from the outset as one of the vilest acts perpetrated by human beings on their fellow human beings.

      Torture is a crime under international law. According to all relevant instruments, it is absolutely prohibited and cannot be justified under any circumstances. This prohibition forms part of customary international law, which means that it is binding on every member of the international community, regardless of whether a State has ratified international treaties in which torture is expressly prohibited. The systematic or widespread practice of torture constitutes a crime against humanity.

      On 12 December 1997, by resolution 52/149, the UN General Assembly proclaimed 26 June the United Nations International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, with a view to the total eradication of torture and the effective functioning of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, (resolution 39/46), annex, which entered into force on 26 June 1987.