The Member States of the European Union

 

28 countries

 
carte pays membres2013
 
In the Fifties, when the composition and functionality of the European Institutions was drafted, the European Community had only six member states. Since that time the Union has expanded six times and now consists of 28 member states. Altogether the Union forms a space with 508 million inhabitants.




The member states of the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom
 
 

Useful links

 
General information, maps about the member states (facts about geography, history, culture, economy…)
 
 
Useful addresses to obtain brochures about a country
 

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European diary


    • 1 october 2016

      Cyprus National Holiday

    • Cyprus had been occupied for 800 years when it gained its independence from Britain in 1960 after a 5-year armed struggle.
      England, Greece and Turkey met in Zurich in February 1959 and signed accords that established the Republic of Cyprus.
      The Cypriot government chose the 1st of October to celebrate the beginning its independence.
    • 3 october 2016

      The German National Holiday

    • October 3rd is associated with the day of German Unity, which symbolizes the unification in 1990 of the two Germanys that had existed since 1945.
      The Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) joined together to form a single state under the Treaty that was signed on October 3rd 1990.
      The Day of German Unity is celebrated in a different city each year, but there are celebrations that occur every year in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin.
    • 10 october 2016

      European Day against Death Penalty

    • The Committee of Ministers of the Council of Europe decided on 26 September 2007, to declare a ''European Day against the Death Penalty,'' which is held annually on 10 October. The Council of Europe has been a pioneer in the abolition process which has made Europe a de facto death-penalty-free zone since 1997. The day is a European contribution to the World Day against the Death Penalty, which is held annually on the same day.